Tag Archives: pop psychology

Dads must stop the wussification of society (part 2)

 Dangerous Thing Number One: Play with Fire Khwezi, a PS2 control in hand, is slamming into virtual cars when I toss him a box of matches. “Let’s have some real fun,” I say. “Let’s burn stuff.” We go outside and … Continue reading

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Dads must make a stand against the wussification of society

“Khwezi,” I said, throwing my son the car keys, “there comes a time in every young man’s life when his father teaches him to drive.” Khwezi’s eyes grew big. The Shrink’s eyes grew even bigger. “Excuse me?” she huffed. “It’s … Continue reading

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Labour is all about the delivery (and making tea)

“ILY?” I typed into my cellphone and hit send. I’d been SMSing these three letters to the Shrink every 15 minutes since the day she was due to give birth to our daughter. The letters are shorthand for In Labour … Continue reading

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Power (naps) to the fathers

I take a step. I wipe my red eyes. I drag my foot forward. I take another step. Marcus looks at me knowingly. “How long haven’t you slept for?” he asks. I look at my watch. “About 11 months.” I … Continue reading

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Adopt or die

The official-looking envelope arrived in the postbox. I tore it open. I’d been waiting for it for more than 18 months. The piece of paper that I’d pulled out confirmed my pop status. It was an adoption order issued by … Continue reading

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Present tense

I was on a mission. I needed information. I knew that The Shrink wouldn’t buckle under interrogation. I could target Rachel, but she’s just 11 months old and I needed more details than “da-da”, “noh-noh” and “mah-mah”. There was only … Continue reading

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Discretion is the better part of cringing

“WHAT’S that?” Khwezi asks. I take a deep breath. Khwezi, my five-year-old son, is pointing at something. Please don’t let him be pointing at what I think he’s pointing at, I beg. You see, we’re in the locker room at … Continue reading

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